Category: Jeffrey Krumpe

Krumpe Wins 2016 Pro Bono Service Award

In connection with National Celebrate Pro Bono week, the 10th Judicial Circuit has awarded Jeffrey E. Krumpe the 2016 Pro Bono Service Award in recognition of his selfless service.  Krumpe has accepted cases from Prairie State Legal Services since 1995.  In that time he has handled 25 cases and provided more than 420 hours of free legal services to clients.  Over the years, Jeff has successfully represented numerous clients with unlawful garnishments,  divorces, lien foreclosures and fraud cases.

Jeffrey Krumpe helps to solidify mechanic’s lien rights of architects, engineers, and surveyors

Jeffrey Krumpe recently participated in a successful appeal to the Illinois Supreme Court, which solidified the mechanic’s lien rights of architects, engineers, and surveyors. Agreeing with Mr. Krumpe’s client, a unanimous Supreme Court held that those design professionals who perform any service for the purpose of improving real property (even when actual construction does not proceed) are entitled to assert a mechanics lien.

The Supreme Court’s opinion can be found here.

An article discussing the case, can be found on the Illinois Bar Association’s web site by clicking here.

Appellate Court Rules No Claim Against City for Violation of Illinois Antitrust Act

Miller, Hall & Triggs LLC Partner, Jeffrey Krumpe, represented the City of Henry, Illinois in the case of Edwards v. City of Henry.  In that case, Mr. Krumpe successfully obtained an appellate court ruling that held a litigant could not assert claims against the City for alleged violations of the Illinois Antitrust Act.  The court also granted the City’s request for sanctions based on a frivolous appeal.

Click here to read the appellate court’s opinion.

Central Illinois Elec. Services v. Slepian

MHT Partner Jeffrey Krumpe represented an electrical contractor asserting mechanics lien rights against a homeowner.  The appellate court interpreted provisions of the Home Repair and Remodeling Act in a way which invalidated the contractor’s mechanics lien rights.  This decision was ultimately overruled by later court decisions and amendments to the law.

Read the appellate court’s now-invalid decision here.